Easy homemade dog treats your pooch (and all of their friends) will LOVE

April 24, 2018

Written By

Mary Friona Celani

Written by Lifestyle Contributor, Jamie Olander 

 

They’ll bring all the dogs to your yard!

These easy-to-make dog treats will have your dogs doing all their best tricks.

 

 

INGREDIENTS

1 cup pumpkin

1/2 cup creamy peanut butter

2 eggs

1/4 cup of coconut oil

2 and 1/2 cups flour

1 teaspoon baking soda

DIRECTIONS

Mix together pumpkin, peanut butter, eggs and coconut oil. Add dry ingredients, flour and baking soda. Mix well.  Roll out the dough with a rolling pin and start making your treats. Grab your favorite cookie cutters or for small dogs the outline of a shot glass (which I just happened to have around 🙂 ) makes the perfect size and shape!  Bake for 15 minutes at 350%. For an extra fun treat you can glaze the top of the cookie.

Glaze 

1/4 cup of creamy peanut butter and 2 tablespoons of bacon grease (who doesn’t love bacon grease!)  or coconut oil. Whip together in a sauce pan on low. Drizzle over cookies and cool.

       

See, told you it was easy! Let me and Miss Bailey know how your pooch liked the treats!

 

 

About Me

Welcome to Totally Buffalo! My name is Mary Friona-Celani and I am the creator of this site! After spending 20 years in the Buffalo media, I moved on to focus on my beautiful family. Now, the time has come for a new project. I was ready for something new. Something mine.
I am born and raised in WNY and my pride runs deep. My husband, Scott and I are very happy to be raising our four daughters here.

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4 Comments

  1. Avatar

    Cool post! I would simply caution you on a couple of things. The basic idea behind making your own dog treats is so that you know exactly what is going into them. Typically.

    In the photo above, we have a generic peanut butter and a can of pumpkin pie mix. Let’s take a look at those two items.

    Peanut butter is an amazing source of protein and healthy fats for dogs, so an excellent choice! But you still want to read the label (just as you should be doing when making dog treat or food purchases). Look for things like xylitol, high sugar content, chemical preservatives, and high fat content. Xylitol, for example, is an additive that you will find in almost all ‘sugar free’ candies and gum, but is highly toxic to dogs and being used in more and more peanut butter brands. All natural is always the best option here.

    For the pumpkin, again an incredible super food for dogs. But stick with pure canned pumpkin, not pie mix. Pie mix has upwards of 25 g of sugar per serving, which will only serve to create a spike in your dogs glycemic index and could contribute to a host of health issues, like diabetes. Essentially erasing the benefits that you were attempting to gain in the first place. Things that you are trying to avoid by making your own treats.

    Rule of thumb is to always read the labels. People food, dog food, it doesn’t matter. If you wouldn’t eat it yourself, why give it to your dog?

    Loved the post and look forward to more!

  2. Avatar

    Cool post! I would simply caution you on a couple of things. The basic idea behind making your own dog treats is so that you know exactly what is going into them. Typically.

    In the photo above, we have a generic peanut butter and a can of pumpkin pie mix. Let’s take a look at those two items.

    Peanut butter is an amazing source of protein and healthy fats for dogs, so an excellent choice! But you still want to read the label (just as you should be doing when making dog treat or food purchases). Look for things like xylitol, high sugar content, chemical preservatives, and high fat content. Xylitol, for example, is an additive that you will find in almost all ‘sugar free’ candies and gum, but is highly toxic to dogs and being used in more and more peanut butter brands. All natural is always the best option here.

    For the pumpkin, again an incredible super food for dogs. But stick with pure canned pumpkin, not pie mix. Pie mix has upwards of 25 g of sugar per serving, which will only serve to create a spike in your dogs glycemic index and could contribute to a host of health issues, like diabetes. Essentially erasing the benefits that you were attempting to gain in the first place. Things that you are trying to avoid by making your own treats.

    Rule of thumb is to always read the labels. People food, dog food, it doesn’t matter. If you wouldn’t eat it yourself, why give it to your dog?

    Loved the post and look forward to more!

  3. Mary Friona

    Thank you!!!!!!!!

  4. Mary Friona

    Thank you!!!!!!!!

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